North Carolina elections board chairman resigns, says he doesn’t want his partisan views to hurt election fraud investigation

North Carolina elections board chairman resigns, says he doesn’t want his partisan views to hurt election fraud investigation

By Amy Gardner December 1

TAR HEEL, N.C. — The Democratic chairman of the state elections board in North Carolina resigned Saturday, saying he did not want his partisan views to undermine a widening investigation into alleged election fraud in the 9th Congressional District race.

Andy Penry, chairman of the nine-member State Board of Elections and Ethics Enforcement, said in a statement to the board obtained by The Washington Post that he was stepping away to allow the investigation to continue “free of attempts at distraction and obstruction so that the truth can be revealed.”

Penry has fielded criticism from North Carolina Republican officials, who have pointed to his Twitter posts — which include a number of tweets highly critical of President Trump — as evidence that the board’s investigation is partisan and baseless.

“The investigation of criminal conduct and absentee voting fraud in the 2018 Republican primary and 2018 general election in congressional District 9 is a matter of vital importance to our democracy,” Penry wrote in the statement. “I will not allow myself to be used as an instrument of distraction in this investigation.”

Penry’s decision came after the nine-member elections board — which includes four Democrats, four Republicans and one unaffiliated voter — agreed unanimously Tuesday to delay certification of the results in the 9th District election amid allegations of an effort to fill in or discard the absentee ballots of Democratic voters.

Republican Mark Harris, who beat incumbent Rep. Robert Pittenger in the primary, leads Democrat Dan McCready in the race by only 905 votes, according to unofficial returns.

On Friday, the state board voted 7 to 2 to continue investigating the fraud allegations, leaving open the possibility that a new election could be called. The Associated Press announced it was revoking its projection that Harris won the seat in southeastern North Carolina.

[N.C. election officials plan hearing over fraud concerns in U.S. House race, raising possibility of new election]

The inquiry further roiled a state already divided over issues of voting rights, voter suppression and fraud.

In a statement Friday, Harris accused the election board of a lack of transparency and called for the results to be immediately certified.

“Make no mistake, I support any efforts to investigate allegations of irregularities and/or voter fraud, as long as it is fair and focuses on all political parties,” Harris said. “But to date, there is absolutely no public evidence that there are enough ballots in question to affect the outcome of this race. Accordingly, the Board should act immediately to certify the race while continuing to conduct their investigation. Anything else is a disservice to the people of the Ninth District.”

Read the Full Article in The Washington Post

Donald J Trump, my point of view

Donald J Trump is the most conservative president that we have had in recent history.

Trump is a “Common Sense” conservative, not an ideological one. He is the most effective anti liberal in a whole generation.

He hasn’t been like that always, he was a Democrat.

Bush’s failure to win in Iraq and Afghanistan and Obama’s disastrous foreign policy

 

Max Boot: “I rather vote for Joseph Stalin than Donald Trump” Wow a well recognized historian saying that it would be better to have a /president that killed ore than 30 million people than a NY businessman that wants to do something good for his country.

Every time you turnaround, he is instinctively saying something that drives the left crazy” Newt Gingrich

 

DJT: ‘Watching Obama drove him to the Right.

 

10 names of nominees to the Supreme Court

he is not afraid to take on the establishment

like Jacksion

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Theodore Roosevelt on Immigration

A discussion on Former president Theodore Roosevelt’s words regarding the assimilation of immigrants into American culture.

Lets find out what is true and what is not about his thoughts on migration.

From Snopes

Theodore Roosevelt was about to finish his first two-year term as governor of the state of New York when the Republican Party chose him as its candidate for vice president in the 1900 national election. The Republicans were victorious at the ballot box that year, but Roosevelt held the vice-presidency for less than a year before he was elevated to the White House upon the assassination of President William McKinley on 14 September 1901, thereby becoming the youngest person ever to hold the office of President of the United States. Roosevelt was elected to a full term as president in 1904, and among his many notable achievements was his selection as a Nobel Peace Prize Laureate for his part in the negotiations leading to the Treaty of Portsmouth that ended the Russo-Japanese War in 1905.

Although Roosevelt did not hold public office again after leaving the presidency in 1909 (his efforts to regain the White House as a third party candidate in 1912 proving unsuccessful), he remained active in the public political sphere. In the waning years of his life, as World War I raged in Europe and America entered the conflict on the side of the Allies, he frequently spoke of his belief that immigrants taking up residence in the U.S. should assimilate into American society as quickly as possible, learn the English language, eschew hyphenated national identities (e.g., “Italian-American”) and declare their primary national allegiance to the United States of America.

On 1 February 1916, for example, Roosevelt advocated measures for strengthening and ensuring the “loyalty” of American immigrants:

 

 

Theodore Roosevelt, speaking at a luncheon given yesterday by Mrs. Vincent Astor for the National Americanization Committee in the Astor Court Building, declared that one of the reasons why many German-Americans have shown greater love for their native land that for their adopted country is that the German system demands greater loyalty than is demanded in this country, and a greater contribution to the common welfare. “And all of you know I am free from a taint of neutrality,” he added, “so I can say this without suspicion.”

The encouragement of better housing conditions and a compulsion to learn the English language, Colonel Roosevelt said, would help the process of Americanization.

“We cannot make the Americanization movement a success,” Colonel Roosevelt said, “unless we approach it from the economic standpoint. It is true that governmentally Germany is an autocracy. But there has been a great deal more industrial freedom there than many of our old industrial communities. The German Government says we expect you to work out good results, to get together with the laborer, and yourselves decide what you are going to pay to the doctors who are to pass upon the health of the employees, and the amount of damages any employee merits. The Government insists upon a great amount of self-government by the people themselves.

“I feel that by insistence upon proper housing conditions we shall indirectly approach this. I want to see the immigrant know that he has got to spend a certain amount of his money in decent housing; that he will not be allowed to live on $2.50 per month board basis.

“Let us say to the immigrant not that we hope he will learn English, but that he has got to learn it. Let the immigrant who does not learn it go back. He has got to consider the interest of the United States or he should not stay here. He must be made to see that his opportunities in this country depend upon his knowing English and observing American standards. The employer cannot be permitted to regard him only as an industrial asset.

“We must in every way possible encourage the immigrant to rise, help him up, give him a chance to help himself. If we try to carry him he may well prove not well worth carrying. We must in turn insist upon his showing the same standard of fealty to this country and to join with us in raising the level of our common American citizenship.

“If I could I would have the kind of restriction which would not allow any immigrant to come here unless I was content that his grandchildren would be fellow-citizens of my grandchildren. They will not be so if he lives in a boarding house at $2.50 per month with ten other boarders and contracts tuberculosis and contributes to the next generation a body of citizens inferior not only morally and spiritually but also physically.”1

Nationalist

What is the definition of Nationalist?

The Free Dictionary

nationalist

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Related to Nationalists: nationalism, Ultranationalists

na·tion·al·ism

(năsh′ə-nə-lĭz′əm, năsh′nə-)

n.

1. Devotion, especially excessive or undiscriminating devotion, to the interests or culture of a particular nation-state.
2. The belief that nations will benefit from acting independently rather than collectively, emphasizing national rather than international goals.
3. The belief that a particular cultural or ethnic group constitutes a distinct people deserving of political self-determination.

na′tion·al·ist adj. & n.
na′tion·al·is′tic adj.
na′tion·al·is′ti·cal·ly adv.

Merriam-Webster

nationalist

noun

na·​tion·​al·​ist | \ˈnash-nə-list,
ˈna-shə-nə-list\

Definition of nationalist 

(Entry 1 of 2)

1 : an advocate of or believer in nationalism

2 : a member of a political party or group advocating national independence or strong national government

nationalist

adjective

Definition of nationalist (Entry 2 of 2)

1 : of, relating to, or advocating nationalism

2 : of, relating to, or being a political group advocating or associated with nationalism